Visitor guide to Duns in Scottish Borders. Includes info on what to see and do, sleeping and eating and interesting facts about areas around Duns. Also the write-up on Duns as 'Not such a Dunce' will interest you.

Phone code: +44 (0)1361

The former county town of  Duns has an air of an old Scottish burgh even today. The spacious Market Square and the old fashioned buildings are well complemented by the great views offered by Duns Law, rising 714 feet above sea level.

The quiet market town of Duns lies in the middle of Berwickshire, surrounded by the fertile farmland of the Merse. Duns is best known as the birthplace of Jim Clark (1936-68), a former farmer who went on to become world motor racing champion twice in the 1960s and who remains one of Britain's greatest ever racing drivers. His successful career was tragically cut short when he was killed in a crash while practising at Hockenheim in Germany.

There are some good local walks, detailed in the leaflet Walks Around Duns. The best walk is to the top of Duns Law (714 ft), from where there are terrific views of the Merse and the Lammermuir Hills to the north. Also at the top is the Covenanter's Stone, which marks the spot where the Covenanting army camped in 1639, awaiting the arrival of Charles I's troops.

Not such a Dunce

Duns was also the birthplace of John Duns Scotus (1266 -1308), a medieval scholar and theologian of some note, who taught at the universities of Oxford and Paris. He opposed the orthodox views of Thomas Aquinas and his teachings divided the Franciscans and Dominicans. After his death his ideas quickly fell out of favour and those who held them were derided as being stupid, and so we have the word "dunce" derived from the heterodox views of John Duns Scotus.

Local Sights & Activities for Duns

Sightseeing

There are many interesting things to do and see in Duns. The elegant Edwardian Manor House of Manderston, designed in the  Georgian style was the erstwhile  grand country residence of the Palmer family. The delightfully pretty interiors with an  unusual silver staircase makes it a must see destination. It is surrounded by  lovely gardens and a tea room, both of  which are open to visitors.

Nearby Ancient Monuments

Castles Nearby

Duns Castle

Massive norman and victorian Border Pele or Peel that dates back to 1320 with later C19 baronial additions by Graham. Still inhabited by the same family since C17 and not open to public.

Manderston House

Manderston is the supreme country house of Edwardian Scotland; the swan-song of its era.

Local Visitor Attractions

The Jim Clark Room in Duns

Museum dedicated to life of racing driver Jim Clark.

Duns Events

Duns Show

Agricultural show with stock judging, trade stands, children's entertainment, gymkhana, horse & pony and lots more. Open 8.00am - 6.00pm. Duns Castle, Duns.

Duns Hotels & Accommodation

The best place to stay, if you can afford it, is the Chirnside Hall Hotel, Tel 818219, Fax 818231, www.chirnsidehallhotel.com, a mile east of Chirnside on the road to Berwick. This Victorian mansion house offers luxurious accommodation and excellent food all day at mid-range prices (booking essential). A cheaper alternative is D Wellfield House , Preston Rd, Tel 883189, www.wellfieldhouse.com, a traditional Georgian house offering great value (no smoking). Also recommended is the non-smoking D-E St Albans, Tel 883285, www.scottishbordersbandb.co.uk, on Clouds, a lane behind the police station. The best place to eat in the area is the award-winning Wheatsheaf at Swinton in the village of Swinton, about 5 miles south of Duns on the A6112, Tel 860257, www.wheatsheaf-swinton.co.uk The food is 1st-class but expensive. Open Tue-Sun 1200-1400, Tue-Sat 1800-2100. Alternatively, you can get cheap bar meals at the Whip and Saddle , on Market Sq, Tel 883215.

Stonefold Farm

Listed farmhouse Bed and breakfast in the Scottish Borders on working farm for Borders touring and within reach of Edinburgh. more details about Stonefold Farm

Self Catering Cottages in Duns

Not such a Dunce

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