One of the small mining villages in central Scotland in Stirling & Trossachs district

Tullibody in Scotland is a small town in Clackmannanshire. It is situated on high ground between the Forth and Devon valleys. The prominent towns nearby are Alloa and Stirling. Even though an old settlement, this town gained economic stability with the development of mining, distilling and textile manufacture during the 19th Century.

The old Parish Church of St Mungo dates from the 16th century and the Bridge at Bridgend was built in 1697 by local masons Thomas and Tobias Bauchop. The four-storey brick factory of John Tullis & Son Ltd (c.1880) is the largest surviving tannery building in Scotland. Today Tullibody is given over to public and private housing with retailing and distilling the chief economic activities.

Tullibody is a former mining town, today neither that industry nor any other major employers have a presence in the town, with many of the residents now migrating to Stirling and Alloa to work. Since the late 1990s and early 2000s, there has been a rapid expansion in the construction field, with 400 new houses built on the north side of the village in the last 5 years.

The town has 4 primary schools - St. Bernadette's, Abercromby, and St. Serf's - with young people also attending St. Modan's and Lornshill secondary schools. You can see the relics of this past industrialised town. Hotels and Bed and Breakfast in Tullibody offer a comfortable stay in a congenial atmosphere.

For more on Tullibody see All You Wanted to Know about Tullibody and Much More.. (external website)

blog comments powered by Disqus