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South Queensferry

To get to South Queensferry from Edinburgh, take buses 43, X43, 47 or 47a from St Andrew Sq Less than a mile from Dalmeny is the ancient town of South Queensferry, which gets its name from the 11th-century St Margaret, who used the town as the crossing point during her trips between her palaces in Edinburgh and Dunfermline, which was Scotland's capital at that time. The town's narrow main street is lined with picturesque old buildings, most striking of which is the row of two-tiered shops. If you fancy a drink, or a meal, or perhaps a bed for the night, try the historic Hawes Inn, which was featured in Stevenson's Kidnapped. The town is dominated by the two great bridges that tower overhead on either side, spanning the Firth of Forth at its narrowest point. The massive steel cantilevered Forth Rail Bridge, over a mile and a half long and 360 ft high and is a staggering monument to Victorian engineering. It was built in 1883-90 and 60,000 tons of steel were used in its construction. Beside it, is the Forth Road Bridge, a suspension bridge built between 1958 and 1964, which ended the 900-year-old ferry crossing between South and North Queensferry. The Road Bridge is open to pedestrians and it's worth walking across for the views of the Rail Bridge. From Hawes Pier, right underneath the Rail Bridge, you can take a variety of pleasure boat cruises on the Forth. Jet Boat Tours , Tel: 3314777, have cruises up the River Almond at Cramond, looking out for dolphins, seals and porpoises en route, as well as 'Bridge Tours' and 'Jet-Boat fun rides'. n Prices are around £5-10 per person. Cruises run Apr/May/Sep/Oct weekends and public holidays 1000-1800; Jun-Aug daily 0930-2000.

Region

Edinburgh

Local Visitor Attractions

  • The Forth Bridge

    The Forth Bridge is one of the most fascinating man-made benchmarks in Scotland.

  • Dalmeny House

    Built in 1815 in Tudor Gothic, Dalmeny House contains a superb collection of 18th-century French furniture, porcelain and tapestries and paintings, including portraits by Gainsborough, Raeburn, Reynolds and Lawrence.