Eric King of Norway sends Plenipotentiaries to treat with Edward

The event which the sagacity of Edward had anticipated, now occurred. The States of Scotland were alarmed at the continuance of civil commotions; and, in a foolish imitation of other foreign powers who had applied to Edward to act as a peacemaker, sent the Bishop of Brechin, the Abbot of Jedburgh, and Geoffrey de Mowbray, as ambassadors to the King of England, requesting his advice and mediation towards composing the troubles of the kingdom. At the same time, Eric king of Norway despatched plenipotentiaries to treat with Edward regarding the affairs of his daughter the queen, and her kingdom of Scotland. The king readily accepted both offers; and finding his presence no longer necessary in France, returned to England, to superintend in person those measures of intrigue and ambition which now entirely occupied his mind. "Now," said he, to the most confidential of his ministers, "the time is at last arrived when Scotland and its petty kings shall be reduced under my power."

But although his intentions were declared thus openly in his private council, he proceeded cautiously and covertly in the execution of his design. At his request, the Scottish regents appointed the Bishops of St Andrews and Glasgow, assisted by Robert Bruce lord of Annandale, and John Comyn, to treat in the presence of the King of England regarding certain matters proposed by the Norwegian commissioners, and empowered them to ratify whatever was there agreed on, "saving always the liberty and honour of Scotland;" and provided that from such measures nothing should be likely to occur prejudicial to that kingdom and its subjects. To this important conference the king, on the part of England, sent the Bishops of Worcester and Durham, with the Earls of Pembroke and Warrene.

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