Submission of Man and the Western Isles, and settlement of the quarrel with Norway

Nor did he lose any time in following up the advantages already gained, by completing the reduction of the little kingdom of Man, and the whole of the Western Isles. For this purpose, he levied an army with the object of invading the Isle of Man, and compelled the petty chiefs of the Hebrides to furnish a fleet for the transport of his troops. But the King of Man, terrified at the impending vengeance, sent envoys with messages of submission; and, fearful that these would be disregarded, set out himself, and met Alexander, who had advanced on his march as far as Dumfries. At this place the Island Prince became the liegeman of the King of Scotland, and consented that, in future, he should hold his kingdom of the Scottish crown; binding himself to furnish to his lord paramount, when required by him, ten galleys or ships of war, five with twenty-four oars and five with twelve.

A military force, commanded by the Earl of Mar, was next sent against those unfortunate chiefs of the Western Isles, who, during the late expedition, had remained faithful to Haco." Some were executed, all were reduced, and the disputes with Norway were finally settled by a treaty, in which that country agreed to yield to Scotland all right over Man, the aEbudae, and the islands in the western seas. The islands in the south seas were also included, but those of Orkney and Shetland expressly excepted. The inhabitants of the Hebrides were permitted the option of either retiring with their property, or remaining to be governed in future by Scottish laws. On the part of the king and the Estates of Scotland, it was stipulated that they were to pay to Norway four thousand marks of the Roman standard, and a yearly quit-rent of a hundred marks sterling for ever. The King of Man received investiture as a vassal of Alexander; and all parties engaged to fulfil their obligations, under a penalty of ten thousand marks, to be exacted by the pope.

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