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Fraserburgh

Fraserburgh, located on the north east corner of Scotland, stands on the shoulder of the beautiful coastline Kinnaird Head, where the Moray Firth meets the North Sea. Locally known as Broch it lies fifty miles north of Aberdeen. Fraserburgh is also known as one of the Scotland's major fishing ports and well stocked harbour with fishing boats, seals, cormorants and seagulls.


Eighteen miles north of Peterhead, at the very northeastern tip of the northeast coast, is the hardy, windswept fishing town of Fraserburgh. Fraserburgh, located on the north east corner of Scotland, stands on the shoulder of the beautiful coastline Kinnaird Head, where the Moray Firth meets the North Sea. Locally known as Broch it lies fifty miles north of Aberdeen. Fraserburgh is also known as one of the Scotland's major fishing ports and well stocked harbour with fishing boats, seals, cormorants and seagulls.

The place originated from a 14th century village Faithlie. Later in 1504 Fraser of Philorth owned the lands of Faithlie and started developing the town which today impresses visitors with its charm. The main attraction of the place is the harbour built in 1546, and the charming castle on Kinnaird Head originated in 1570s. Soon a royal charter of James VI made the town a royal burgh of regality, after which the town got its name Fraserburgh. The castle situated in the town was after two centuries converted into the first lighthouse in Scotland.

The main activity of this town is fishing which gave the town a place in the map. The harbour facilitated Fraserburgh to expand its fishing industry. In this development stride railways also supported, enabling catches to be sent all around Europe. Soon the place developed as one of the major fishing settlement in the North East. Still Fraserburgh woos visitors by its fishing culture and varied attraction.

Travel Directions to Fraserburgh

Bluebird Buses, Tel. 01224-212266, run regular buses to and from Aberdeen, via Mintlaw, and Peterhead. There are also buses to Banff via Pennan and Gardenstown (No 273; Mon-Sat).

Roads

A90

Things to Do

  • Fraserburgh Bay & Esplanade

    Wonderful 3 mile long sandy bay that sweeps in acrescent towards the point. It's the North Sea so the water is cold!

  • Aberdeenshire Farming Museum

    Aberdeenshire Farming Museum, located in the Aden Country Park is well known for top quality of its Aberdeen Angus coos (Cattle).

  • Arbuthnot Museum

    See how sea played a major role in the history, wealth and development of Peterhead.  Find out how people lived at sea, detailed models in one of Aberdeenshire's oldest museums.

Local Sights & Activities for Fraserburgh

At the northern tip of the town is Kinnaird Head Castle and Lighthouse, which now houses Scotland's Lighthouse Museum. This bizarre structure started out as a 16th-century castle which was then converted by the Northern Lighthouse Company in 1787 into one of mainland Scotland's first lighthouses. The museum offers a truly fascinating illumination of the engineering skill and innovation involved in the design and workings of the lighthouse, with displays of the huge lenses and prisms, as well as a history of the Stevenson family (Robert Louis' father and grandfather) who designed many of Scotland's lighthouses. The highlight is the guided tour to the top of Kinnaird Head Lighthouse itself. Apr-Oct Mon-Sat 1000-1700, Sun 1200-1700; Nov-Mar Closed. Tel. 511022.

It boast many places to explore like the Scottish Lighthouse Museum, and if one eyes to know more about all famous people and founders who played key role to make the place attractive and popular there lies the Fraserburgh Heritage Centre. The town has a refreshing feel by the attractive countryside and surroundings. The local Faithlie fest in summer is famous for boosting local talents through a variety of events and performances.

Driving along just 45 minutes from Fraserburgh takes to the south of Aberdeen which has a wide variety of things to explore. Heading towards west along the coastal route lies the scenic coastline full of charming cliffs, and the beautiful fishing villages of Crovie and Pennan. The place also boasts seabirds like gannet, gullimot and many others. Driving for an hour takes to the scenic castles of Fyvie, Huntly, Tolquhon, Haddo House and Duff House all these castles are open for having a look for visitors and notice how elegant the architectural works shine.

All these features of Fraserburgh attract more and more visitors to explore this unique town of Aberdeenshire. The variety of accommodation available in Fraserburgh includes hotels, guest houses, B&B's and cottages offering great comforts and style. Being close to Aberdeen, there lies plenty of shops and activities to do and enjoy in and around the town.

The Fraserburgh Tourist Information Centre is at 3 Saltoun Square. Tel. 518315. Apr-Jun and Sep Mon-Sat 1000-1300 and 1400-1700; Jul-Aug Mon-Sat 1000-1300 and 1400-1800, Sun 1300-1700.

Pennan, Crovie & Gardenstown Guide

Between Fraserburgh and Macduff/Banff lies a trio of charming little coastal villages, clinging hungrily to the sea cliffs like babies to their mothers' breasts. The most easterly is Pennan, which shot to fame in 1982 when the hit British movie Local Hero was filmed here. The tiny hamlet lies just off the road, at the foot of a very steep hill, and consists of little more than a row of neat, whitewashed cottages, bravely challenging the North Sea. The only place to eat and sleep is the cheap and cosy Pennan Inn, Tel. 01346-561201.

A few miles west, on the other side of Troup Head, is the equally lovely little fishing village of Gardenstown (or Gamrie, pronounced 'Game-ree'), whose streets are so precipitous you almost need to be roped up to get around on foot, never mind trying to drive a car. You can also sleep here, at The Palace Farm, (website seems to be dead - www.gamrie.com. Tel. 01261-851261, March-Nov; or Bankhead Croft, Tel. 01261-851584, both of which provide dinner. A stone's throw away is the even tinier village of Crovie (pronounced 'Crivvie'), which is so narrow its residents have to walk sideways. Tidewater Cottage offers local self catering accommodation.

Fraserburgh Hotels & Accommodation

Accommodation is fairly thin on the ground. You can compare some local hotel prices on our hotel comparison service. The most notable location is The Bay Hotel (Review 3.2/5 Tel: 0044 1346 571393). There used to be the Saltoun Arms Hotel which is being converted into bedsits according to latest information, Tel. 518282; or B&B at Clifton House, 131 Charlotte St, Tel. 518365. There's also a campsite 5 miles west of town at Rosehearty, which has a good beach.

The best place to eat is Findlays (also offers accommodation), at Smiddyhill Rd and Boothby Rd, for good fish and Aberdeen Angus steaks (tel: 01346 519547).

Eat in the Lighthouse Museum restaurant for the wonderful surroundings.

Self Catering Cottages in Crovie

Self Catering Cottages in Pennan

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